Intensified forestry can change surface water quality

“The ambition to use forestry as a climate mitigation measure should take into consideration the potential effects of forestry management methods on soil and surface water quality, in particular in acid-sensitive areas such as southern Norway.” This is the main message of a new paper titled “Intensified forestry as a climate mitigation measure alters surface water quality in low intensity

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use of satellite images, land-use statistics and coefficients to predict nutrient runoff

Can land-use-specific export coefficients be used together with satellite images (Landsat) and/or regional land-use statistics to estimate loads and concentrations of total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and suspended solids? This question was raised by the authors of a new publication in Science of the Total Environment. Main author is Biowater’s PhD student Joy Bhattacharjee. The study area was the Simojoki catchment

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New paper on browning of lake waters

A new paper on lake water browning has just been published. Increasing lake water color has been observed in the Northern Hemisphere during recent decades. Browner water has pronounced effects on both the freshwater ecology and society, as it may reduce light transmission, alter aquatic species composition, enhance anoxia and increase the cost of drinking water treatment.  Explanation to increased

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Higher long-term nutrient losses from forestry than previously believed

With the emerging bioeconomy it is important to understand how forestry drainage affects nutrient losses. A new paper has used long-term data to assess export at different spatial scales in Finland. The authors found that long-term impacts of forest drainage are much higher than previously estimated. Hence, drained areas of forests are hotspots for the export of total nitrogen, total

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comparing nutrient reference conditions in nordic streams

Reference conditions can be defined as the natural state of a water body. The concept is becoming increasingly important since climate and land use changes increase the pressures on our water bodies. However, determining nutrient reference conditions in areas that have been cultivated for centuries has proven difficult. BIOWATER scientists have therefore compared how the Nordic countries have approached the

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BIOWATER activities presented in new film

Watch this new video from BIOWATER, to get an overview of our current objectives and activities! BIOWATER has to date had 11 PhD-students either directly enrolled or associated, of which one has already achieved his title. The remaining 10, along with our senior scientists and post.doc’s, keep up the momentum to explore how a bioeconomy may affect our freshwaters and

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did you say ecosystem services?

“Ecosystem services” has become an increasingly used concept in the academic world. One (of many) definitions is that ecosystem services are the benefits people obtain from ecosystems. Like the feature photo indicates, this can be the recreational benefits given to us by a lake, or it can be clean drinking water, healthy fish for dinner, insects that pollinate and thereby

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What headwater streams can tell us

A milestone in BIOWATER was reached when the paper “Land-use dominates climate controls on nitrogen and phosphorus export from managed and natural Nordic headwater catchments” was published in the scientific journal Hydrological Processes. In Module 2 of BIOWATER, our aim is to understand catchment processes and trends in nutrients by analysing long-term data series. In this paper, 12 authors have

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